Exhibit 6-2
Examples of Information to Obtain During Initial Interviews
Topic Area Interview with the Identified Child Interview with the Siblings Interview with All Nonoffending Adults in the Home Interview with Alleged Maltreating Parent or Caretaker
The Alleged Maltreatment
  • Description of what happened with respect to the alleged maltreatment, when and where it occurred, and who was present
  • Child's current condition
  • Type, severity, and chronicity of the maltreatment
  • Effects of maltreatment (e.g., extreme withdrawal, fear of parents)
  • Identity of others who have information about the child's condition and the family situation
  • Information about alleged maltreatment
  • Maltreatment they have experienced and, if so, how, when, where, how often, and for how long
  • What the adults know about the alleged maltreatment
  • Feelings regarding the maltreatment and about CPS
  • Acceptance or rejection of the child's version of what might have happened and who the adult deems responsible
  • Capacity to protect the child (if indicated) and his or her opinion about the vulnerability of the child
  • Description of what happened in relation to alleged maltreatment
  • Response to the incident(s) and to CPS
  • Access to the child
The Child
  • Child's characteristics (e.g., age, developmental level, physical or mental handicaps, health, mental health status)
  • Child's behavior and feelings
  • Child's relationship with peers, family, and others
  • Child's daily routine (e.g., school, home life)
  • Information that could not be obtained from the identified child or confirmation of information gathered during the initial interview
  • Feelings, expectations, and perspective about the identified child and siblings
  • Empathy for the child's condition and experience
  • Description of the child's feelings and behaviors
  • View of the child and the child's characteristics and condition
  • Relationship with the child and others in the family
The Family
  • Asking who resides in the home
  • Child's relationship with and feelings toward the parents or caregivers and siblings
  • Child's perception of the relationships among others in the household
  • Child's perception of how family problems are addressed and how the family communicates
  • Description of who's involved in child care responsibilities (e.g., extended family, informal kin)
  • Child's perception of the family's identification with a tribe, race, or larger cultural group
  • Child's perception of the family's rituals, traditions, and behaviors
  • Child's description and perception of what happens when parents or caregivers fight
  • Siblings' characteristics, behaviors, and feelings
  • Further information about the parents (e.g., feelings and behaviors frequently exhibited, problems, child rearing measures, and parents' relationships outside the home)
  • Further information about the family's functioning, dynamics, demographics, and characteristics
  • Relationship to the child and to the alleged maltreating caretaker
  • Approach to and view of parenting
  • How decisions are made in the family, and who usually makes decisions about the children
  • Types of discipline they considered appropriate
  • Who is involved in child care responsibilities in the family
  • How cultural beliefs are incorporated in family functioning
  • Role religion plays in the family, and how it affects child-rearing practices
  • Family's rituals, traditions, and behaviors
  • Roles in the family and family functioning
  • Communication and expressions of affection
  • Demographics about the family, including financial status and other factors that may be stress producing
  • Presence of domestic violence or partner abuse
  • Approach to parenting, expectations, and sensitivity to children
  • Roles and functioning in the family
  • Methods of communication and level of affection
  • Who usually makes decisions about the children in the family
  • Discipline the family considers to be appropriate
  • Responsibility for child care
  • Cultural beliefs incorporated in family functioning
  • Role religion plays in the family and how it affects child rearing
  • Family's rituals, traditions, and behaviors
  • Description of demographics about the family, including financial status and other factors that may be stress producing
  • Presence of domestic violence or partner abuse
The Environment
  • Child's description of where they go during parent or caregiver fights, whether they have tried to stop a fight, and who they would call for help
  • Description of the neighborhood, available resources, and the degree of crime or violence
  • Child's description of where they go during parent or caregiver fights, whether they have tried to stop a fight, and who they would call for help
  • Description of the neighborhood, available resources, and the degree of crime or violence
  • Description of the neighborhood, available resources, and the degree of crime or violence
  • A description of the neighborhood, available resources, and the degree of crime or violence
The Adult or Caretaker blank cell blank cell
  • Approach to solving problems, ability to deal with stress, use of drugs or alcohol
  • History as a child (positive and negative memories), educational and employment history, any criminal activity, or history of physical or mental health problems
  • Relationships with others, memberships in clubs, or other activities
  • View of support network in his or her life, relationships with extended family, and the climate of the neighborhood and community
  • Present emotional state, particularly in terms of the possibility of further harm to the child
  • Approach to solving problems, dealing with stress, using drugs or alcohol, coping
  • View of self
  • History as a child and an adult, including any mental health or health problems, criminal history, etc.
  • Relationships outside the home, supports, memberships, and affiliations
  • Willingness to accept help (if needed)